Archive for category art/design

New York City Landmarks

“Skyscraper National Park.”

That is what Kurt Vonnegut famously labeled New York City in his 1976 novel Slapstick. It’s true, the city is filled with tall buildings, and many of them stunningly beautiful. Yet, New York City also has other, lesser-known landmarks that don’t necessarily touch the clouds. And these locations—such as Warren Place Mews in Brooklyn or the Cloisters on Manhattan’s northern tip—are just as worthy of a trip to the Big Apple as any of its iconic buildings. Whether you’re a New Yorker or planning your maiden trip to the city, AD rounded up 27 of the best architectural landmarks to visit while walking the streets of the city. Some you will recognize instantly, but there are sure to be a few that will leave you impressed by the New York you never knew existed.

a view of Jane's Carousel with the Brooklyn Bridge and One World Trade Center in the background.

Photo: Getty Images/Pawel Gaul

Originally built in 1922 and located on the banks of the East River, Brooklyn’s Jane’s Carousel has become a popular destination to visit. After extensive renovations, the carousel reopened in 2011 and featured, among other additions, a jewel-like glass exterior that was designed by architect Jean Nouvel.

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Kimbell Art Museum

About the Collection

The Kimbell’s permanent collection is small in size, comprising fewer than 350 works of art, and is distinguished by an extraordinary level of artistic quality and importance. The idea of building a choice collection of representative masterpieces was established by the Board of Directors of the Kimbell Art Foundation in consultation with Museum’s first director, Richard F. (Ric) Brown, in a Policy Statement of June 1, 1966:

The dominating principle involved in the acquisition process is that the stature of the Museum depends more upon the quality of the definitive objects that it contains than on the historical completeness of its collections. A prospective addition to the collections, therefore, is to be judged from the standpoint of aesthetic quality and typicality, and whether it defines a master, period, school, style, or area. The goal shall be definitive excellence, not size of collection.

Leaving to older and larger institutions the role of collecting broadly and in depth, the Kimbell has continued to pursue quality over quantity. Its holdings range from the third millennium B.C. to the mid-20th century and include major works by Duccio, Fra Angelico, Caravaggio, Poussin, Velázquez, Bernini, Rembrandt, Goya, Monet, Cézanne, Picasso, Mondrian, and Matisse. The collection comprises Asian and non-Western as well as European art, and extends only to the mid-20th century in recognition that this is where the collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth begins, and omits American art since this is the focus of another neighboring institution, the Amon Carter Museum.

Antiquities

The Kimbell’s select holdings of antiquities range from the Egyptian Old Kingdom of the third millennium B.C. through ancient Assyria, Greece, and Rome, and to the Early Christian Church in the fifth century.

European Art

The collection of European paintings and sculpture is remarkably rich in works of the Italian Renaissance, although its fullest and most celebrated holdings are in Italian, French, Spanish, Dutch, and Flemish works of the 17th century.

Asian Art

The Asian collection comprises sculptures, paintings, bronzes, ceramics, and works of decorative art from China, Korea, Japan, India, Nepal, Tibet, Cambodia, and Thailand.

Art of the Ancient Americas

Ancient American art is represented by Maya works in ceramic, stone, shell, and jade; Olmec, Zapotec, and Aztec sculpture; and pieces from the Conte and Wari cultures.

African and Oceanic Art

The African collection consists primarily of bronze, wood, and terracotta sculpture from West and Central Africa, including examples from Nigeria, Angola, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Oceanic art is represented by a Maori figure.

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New Media Art

Digital art is a term associated with artistic works that use digital technology as an essential part of the creative or presentation process. Various names have been used since 1970 to describe this media including computer art, multimedia art, virtual art and recently placed under the larger umbrella term new media art. Digital technology has transformed activities such as photography, videos, painting, drawing, sculpture, music and sound. New forms, such as net art and virtual reality, have become recognized artistic practices. The techniques of digital art are extensively used by the mainstream media in advertisements, by film-makers to produce special effects and by photographers using digital cameras and editing software. YouTube is now helping revolutionize and exponentially expand the Digital art medium.

by cj
World News US

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Freedom…

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cj

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Connection…


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“Vinho Verde” – shot with a Nikon D3100

Original photo, no editing of any kind

Contributing photo by cj almeida

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where Art meets Style

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artwork

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by cj

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